Email Archive

  • Thursday, December 09, 2010 12:00 PM | Anonymous

    218 More Museums with Netsuke and Inro for You to Visit!

    In another step forward in adding useful content to the INS website, this week we have enlarged the list of Museums from ten to 218! We believe that most of these museums contain netsuke, inro, and related items in their collections. Some of these netsuke are in storage, some are on display, and some of them are available on their website.

    The links to their websites, when available, as most are, should allow you to obtain the latest contact information. These links are not hyperlinks, but you can use them by copying and pasting them in your URL bar. We hope to make them active links next year.

    Go to: http://www.netsuke.org/museum_collections.htm

    The museums are generally organized in alphabetic order within Continent, Country, and State.

    For more information on most of these Museums and their collections, netsuke-related books and articles about them can be found in The Ultimate Netsuke Bibliography (TUNB, the book), Chapter 13: Museums, with even more at TUNB online at www.internetsuke.com/tunb. Extensive searches might be necessary due to museum name changes since the original publication (1999), and various translations of museum names into English at different times. Searches by geographic location might be very helpful.

    Some of these museums may have hosted a netsuke or netsuke-related exhibit in the past, with some publication that is documented in The Ultimate Netsuke Bibliography (TUNB), book or updated on-line, but they may not actually have any netsuke in their collections today.

    Much of this data was compiled over the last twenty-five years by Norman L. Sandfield in direct correspondence with the Museums. Since this list has been compiled from many different resources, the format of the records will be different. We are not able to confirm all of the data, thus corrections and updates are always welcome.

    There are a number of various correct ways the word netsuke is spelled in non-English languages: Necuke, netsuke, netskes, netsukes, netzke, and netzkes. REF: TUNB, page 344. There are also many ways to spell ‘museum’ in different languages. Thus, there will probably be museums on the Internet that have not yet been found, because of spelling variations that Google did not catch.

    At the front and end of the list are other museum resources, and possible museum resources, for lovers of netsuke and inro.

    Many thanks to Makiko Komada for her website and support on Japanese Museums, at http://www.cc.rim.or.jp/~komada/e-museums.html

    ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS SHOULD BE SENT TO:

    NORMAN L SANDFIELD at netsuke@sandfield.org

    =================================

    Norman L. Sandfield,

    INS Email Blast-Master

  • Monday, November 22, 2010 12:00 PM | Anonymous

    Please join the NEW YORK chapter of the INTERNATIONAL NETSUKE SOCIETY at its next meeting:

    Sunday, Dec. 5, 2010

    2:00 pm

    Szechuan Chalet

    1395 Second Avenue (near 72nd/73rd Streets)

    Restaurant phone: 212-737-1838

    Bob Goode will present an annual favorite, highlighting the upcoming new year.

    This year's presentation is on "The Year of the Hare."

    He will consider the position of the hare in Asian Art, with special reference to the portrayal of hares in netsuke.

    Please feel free to bring any hare or other netsuke to show the group.

    Please also bring cash for your food/drink.

    RSVP to: Jeffrey Klotz, 973-616-2988 or jklotz@takaraasianart.com

  • Saturday, November 13, 2010 12:00 PM | Anonymous

    INTERNATIONAL NETSUKE SOCIETY

    Seattle Chapter

    You are cordially invited to attend our winter Luncheon meeting

    SUNDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2010, 1:00 p.m.

    For directions call Karen and Eric Knudson 206-528-9870, or email at kandeknudson@hotmail.com

    Lunch $12 - $20, please bring cash. Bar is open

    Phone Karen Knudson for directions: (206) 528 - 9870

    RSVP - Richard Hieronymus (Chapter Chairman)

    E-mail <RHMusic_netsuke@interisland.net> or Phone: 1-360-378-3556

    The INS Seattle Chapter
    presents
    Norman L. Sandfield
    speaking on


    Images of Netsuke, depicted in Woodblock Prints and other Japanese Art Forms
    (Netsuke on Prints, Netsuke on Netsuke, and More Images of Netsuke on . . .)

    Norman L. Sandfield, from Chicago, a dealer in fine netsuke for more than 30 years, will talk about his collection of images of netsuke depicted in a wide variety of media. This includes antique and vintage Japanese woodblock prints, a French etching, netsuke images on antique and contemporary netsuke, netsuke on scrolls, netsuke on sword fittings, netsuke and inro on Japanese and French scarves, on kimono and obi, and on contemporary paintings. All of these art forms help to show how netsuke were worn by the Japanese as seen through the eyes of both 19th and 20th century Japanese and other artists. These prints are rare since netsuke are usually worn on the man’s back right hip, and thus rarely shown in prints where the front of the person is most often the center of interest for the artist. Most of these have never been seen or published anywhere.

    The focus of Sandfield’s collection, possibly the world’s largest, is the illustration of netsuke in Japanese and Japanese-related art. This variation on collecting: the search for the object as the subject of an illustration, rather than the specific object itself, has been applied to other collecting areas. For example bonsai, ikebana, Go boards, and toys are all found as the subject of many Japanese woodblock prints, and actively sought after by collectors of these specific items. R onin Gallery even has specific categories on their website drop-down menu for Umbrellas, Flower Arranging, Tattoos, ....

    In the Japanese woodblock prints with netsuke, inro, and related sagemono (hanging objects) on them, there are more than thirty prints in various formats: single page, diptych, triptych, one page from a triptych, smaller surimono (prints), even smaller shunga (erotic) prints, and even one French etching by Philippe Burty (1830-1890). ["Japonisme" is a term coined by French art-critic Philippe Burty in 1876 to describe the craze for things Japanese.] They show Japanese men, including actors and sumo wrestlers, wearing and holding netsuke with various sagemono attached to them, or with the ensembles just sitting on the ground.

    There are also a dozen tsuba and other Samurai sword fittings, individual pieces and matching sets, that are decorated with netsuke and inro en suite. Additionally, the collection has more than a dozen unusual "netsuke with netsuke”: netsuke showing someone wearing and / or carrying a netsuke ensemble, or a netsuke ensemble sitting alone. In addition, he has many netsuke carved by the 20th century netsuke artist Ichiro Inada showing various sagemono being worn by his favorite subjects, many with beautiful inlays. Additionally, there are some okimono with netsuke and other sagemono incorporated into them.

    This presentation will be filled with many unusual illustrations and surprising images.

    ===========================================

    Norman L. Sandfield

    INS Email Blast Master

    netsuke@sandfield.org

  • Saturday, September 25, 2010 12:00 PM | Anonymous

    International Netsuke Society

    Seattle Chapter

    You are cordially invited to attend our luncheon meeting

    Sunday, October 17, 2010, 1:00 p.m.

    Guest Speaker: Paul Moss

    Mr. Moss will present a power-point presentation on the Nordskog Exhibition

    of very beautiful inro ensembles, pipecases and netsuke with new information.

    As a “Lucky Strike” extra he will discuss Centenary Show major new information.

    Paul will have netsuke from a new collection for show, tell & sale.

    on RITSUO (1663 – 1747)

    Don’t miss this FANTASTIC event.

    Lunch as usual $15 - $22. (bring cash) – bar is open.

    Please RSVP - INS Seattle Chapter Chairman for directions and other details.

    Richard Hieronymus RHMusic_netsuke@interisland.net

    Or phone (360) 378-3556

    ================================================================

    Norman L. Sandfield

    INS Email Blast Master

    netsuke@sandfield.org

  • Thursday, September 09, 2010 12:00 PM | Anonymous

    Just a reminder . . .

    [And please read the self-congratulatory postscript.]

    Members of the International Netsuke Society are invited to participate in organizing an exhibition of netsuke from the Raymond and Frances Bushell Collection at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The deadline, however, is approaching.

    In order to take part, your list must be received by LACMA by October 1st.

    See below for further details.

    As you probably know, Los Angeles has been chosen as the host-city for the next convention of the International Netsuke Society to be held in May 2011.

    The Los Angeles County Museum of Art is home to the Raymond and Frances Bushell Collection of Netsuke. In conjunction with the upcoming INS Convention, LACMA is planning to organize an exhibition of netsuke from the Bushell collection. With a fresh approach, rather than focusing on their traditional role as functional items or their meanings as cultural artifacts, this exhibition will focus on netsuke’s place in the modern-day domain of art collecting.

    We invite INS members to participate as we seek to compile a selection of the ‘top’ works in the Bushell Collection at LACMA. The exhibition aims to reflect what netsuke collectors today consider the most outstanding works based on the responses we receive from INS members worldwide. We hope you will share with us your ‘Top 10’ favorites from the Bushell Collection.

    To take part in this survey simply go to one of the currently available sources where the entire collection can be seen and select the ten netsuke from the collection that you find to be the most outstanding examples. The Raymond and Frances Bushell Collection at the LACMA can be seen in its entirety in two places. The 2003 collection catalog titled “The Raymond and Frances Bushell Collection of Netsuke: A Legacy at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art” and the LACMA web site located at www.lacma.org (see below for a link to the site.)

    Please fax your list to (323) 857-4703 or send it via email to cdrosse@lacma.org If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Chris Drosse at the above email address. The deadline for responses is October 1st.

    This is an entirely anonymous process. No names will appear on any lists, labels or other exhibition-related materials.

    To view all of the netsuke in the Bushell collection, click on the following link.

    http://collectionsonline.lacma.org/mwebcgi/mweb.exe?request=advform

    The page that opens should be the Advanced Search page. In the KEYWORDS box enter Bushell and then hit SEARCH at the bottom of the page. This search should bring up 878 objects. (You can also do more specific searches if you are looking for a particular artist, subject, etc.)

    ===========================================

    P.S. I hope you are as pleased as I am to celebrate this INS Constant Contact Email Blast #50, and see that we have been able to keep in contact with email-enabled members in a very timely manner! I hope you will encourage your netsuke-collecting friends to go to the INS website to sign up for these email blasts. I also hope that non-members receiving these emails will consider joining the Society, and receiving all of the even-more-valuable many full-color illustrated articles in our quarterly INS Journal.

    Norman L. Sandfield

    INS Email Blast Master

    netsuke@sandfield.org

  • Thursday, September 09, 2010 12:00 PM | Anonymous

    The NEW YORK chapter of the INTERNATIONAL NETSUKE SOCIETY will host its next meeting:

    Sunday, September 26, 2010, 2:00 pm

    Szechuan Chalet

    1395 Second Avenue (near 72nd/73rd Streets)

    Restaurant phone: 212-737-1838

    Dieuwke Eijer will be giving a talk on kagamibuta. Please feel free to bring any netsuke you'd like to show the group.

    Please also bring cash for your food/drink.

    RSVP to: Diane Drinnon, 212-828-7088 or ddrinnon@mac.com.

    Best Regards,

    Diane

  • Thursday, September 02, 2010 12:00 PM | Anonymous

    Autumn public opening of
    the Kyoto Seishu Netsuke Art Museum


    The Kyoto Seishu Netsuke Art Museum, Japan’s first museum exclusively dedicated to netsuke, is proud to announce that its autumn public opening has been scheduled for the month of November, 2010.  

    The museum holds approximately 2,500 netsuke pieces dating from the Edo period to the present and exhibits 500 selected pieces to the public four times a year. It is located near Nijo Castle in a remodeled samurai residence that has preserved the stateliness of the original residence, the only such one remaining in the Mibu area in the heart of Kyoto, Japan’s former capital.

    Highlighted as this season’s special program is an exhibition featuring works of 40 netsuke artists under the themed of “Iwai (congratulation).” We hope you will enjoy the world of Iwai that is expressed through netsuke in the shapes of a sea beam which is usually served in festive occasions and two men singing and carrying a chest which contains bride’s belongings at a wedding, and so on. New works specially created for this theme are on display.

    For further information, our next public opening in winter has been scheduled for 1st through 28th of February 2011.

    Sincerely yours,

    Muneaki Kinoshita
    Director, Kyoto Seishu Netsuke Art Museum




    【Period】 Monday, November 1 to Tuesday, November 30, 2010
    【Time】  10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (No admission after 4:30 p.m.) 【Place】 46-1 Mibukayougosho-cho, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto, 604-8811, Japan
    (On the east side of the Mibu-dera Temple) Phone: 075-802-7000
    【Admission fee】 (inclusive of consumption tax)
    For adults  : 1,200 yen
    For students : (Jr. & Sr. high school) 600 yen *(Student ID required.)

    * Children at elementary school age and below are not allowed in the museum.
    * Photography is prohibited within the museum.
    * No parking space is available. (Please use public transportation utilities.)

    Contact :
    Kyoto Seishu Netsuke Art Museum, Public Relations Office
    (c/o Information Workshop Co.)

    Phone : 075-353-7714
    FAX : 075-353-7724
    E-mail : netsukekan@info-works.jp
    URL : http://www.netsukekan.jp
  • Tuesday, August 31, 2010 12:00 PM | Anonymous

    Rare Japanese Ceramic Netsuke Go on View at Toledo Museum of Art

    TOLEDO, OHIO–Tiny, whimsical, utilitarian and extremely rare Japanese sculptural works star in a new exhibition this fall at the Toledo Museum of Art.

    Life in Miniature: Ceramic Netsuke from the Silverman Collection showcases more than 200 objects in the Museum’s Asian collection, most of them from Japan’s Edo Period (1615-1868). The exhibition, on view Oct. 1, 2010–Feb. 27, 2011 in Gallery 18, features 226 ceramic netsuke recently donated to the Museum by Richard Silverman. Admission to the exhibition and to the Museum is free.
    From the early seventeenth century through the middle of the nineteenth century, wealthy Japanese men wore opulent personal accessories such as inro (cases) that attached to their silk clothing by small fasteners known as netsuke (pronounced NET-skeh). Netsuke were created in a wide variety of materials and eventually became highly collectable for their wit, whimsy and craftsmanship.

    Life in Miniature explores the utilitarian use and cultural meaning of netsuke, their iconography and their depiction of everyday and fantastic subject matter. It also highlights the special nature of netsuke made in the famed ceramics kilns of Japan, rather than carved from materials such as ivory or wood. Inro, kimono, paintings and the Museum’s fabulous gold-ground Japanese screens showing Kyoto, where many of the objects were made, also are on display.

    “Ceramic netsuke are quite rare and, as a result, quite valuable,” notes exhibition curator Carolyn Putney, Director of Collections and Curator of Asian Art at TMA. “Anyone who likes to collect will marvel at this fine collection. The very existence of these fragile miniature sculptural objects makes them significant,” Putney says.

    A companion catalog, Adornment in Clay: Ceramic Netsuke from the Richard R. Silverman Collection, will be available for purchase at the Museum Store, for $11.95.

    Life in Miniature: Netsuke from the Silverman Collection is made possible by TMA members. The exhibition also is supported in part through the sustainable grant program of the Ohio Arts Council, which encourages economic growth, educational excellence and cultural enrichment for all Ohioans.

    ===================================

    More information from the FACT SHEET

    Content: During the Edo Period (1615–1868) wealthy Japanese men wore opulent personal accessories such as inro (cases) that attached to their silk clothing by small fasteners known as netsuke (pronounced NET-skeh). Netsuke were created by Japanese artists in a wide variety of materials and became highly collectable for their wit, whimsy and craftsmanship. More than 200 objects from Japan, including 226 ceramic netsuke recently donated to the Museum by Richard Silverman, as well as inro, kimono and paintings are shown. The exhibition explores the utilitarian use and cultural meaning of the objects, as well as the iconography of the netsuke and their depiction of everyday and fantastic subject matter.
    Credits: Life in Miniature is organized by the Toledo Museum of Art with the support of its members. The exhibition also is supported in part through the sustainable grant program of the Ohio Arts Council, which encourages economic growth, educational excellence and cultural enrichment for all Ohioans

    Information: Teri Sharp, Public Relations Manager
    Tel: 419-254-5082 or 419-308-4213 (mobile)
    tsharp@toledomuseum.org
    =================================
    Exhibition Related Programming

    FREE Presentation: Adornment in Clay Oct. 1: 7:30 p.m., Little Theater
    Laura J. Mueller is an independent curator and scholar based in New York. Mueller, who studied Japanese art history at the University of Wisconsin, is the author of TMA’s netsuke exhibition companion book, Adornment in Clay: Ceramic Netsuke from the Richard R. Silverman Collection.

    FREE Hands-on Activity: Animal Netsuke
    Oct. 1: 7–9 p.m., Libbey Court
    Join us for the opening of the Life in Miniature: Ceramic Netsuke from the Silverman Collection Exhibition and create your own version of an animal netsuke using clay.

    FREE Public Tours
    Oct. 1: 6:30 and 7 p.m., Libbey Court
    Oct. 2: 2 and 3 p.m., Libbey Court
    Oct. 2 and 3 p.m., Libbey Court

    FREE Family Center Activities: Miniature Wonders!
    Oct. 3: Noon to 5:30 p.m.
    Oct. 5 and Oct. 7: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
    See the Museum’s netsuke (NET-skay) exhibition and make your own version of a netsuke animal using clay.

    Japanese Tea Ceremony
    Nov. 12: 7 p.m., Green Room
    Experience the art of the ancient tea ceremony and enjoy Japanese tea and desserts. Purchase tickets ($20 members/$30 nonmembers) by calling 419-254-5771, ext. 7432.

    FREE Hands-on: Japanese Sansui (Landscapes)
    Nov. 26: 7–9 p.m., Libbey Court
    Discover the beauty of Japanese landscapes like the ones displayed in the Toledo Museum of Art collection. Using a wide variety of materials, such as ink and rice paper, create your own version. A majority of Japanese landscape paintings depict mountains and flowing water. “San” means mountain and “sui” means water.

    ===============================
    Note: For images objects in the exhibition or more information, contact Teri Sharp, public relations manager, at 419-254-5082 or tsharp@toledomuseum.org, or Kelly Fritz Garrow, director of communications, at 419-255-8000, ext. 7408, or kgarrow@toledomuseum.org.
    The mission of the Toledo Museum of Art is based upon the belief in the power of art to ignite the imagination, stimulate thought, and provide enjoyment. Through our collection and programs, we strive to integrate art into the lives of people.
    The Toledo Museum of Art is a nonprofit arts institution funded through individual donations, foundation grants, corporate sponsorships, and investments. The Ohio Arts Council helps fund programs at the Toledo Museum of Art through a sustainable grant program that encourages economic growth, educational excellence, and cultural enrichment for all Ohioans.
    Admission to the Museum is free. The Museum is open Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Friday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday, Noon to 6 p.m.; closed Mondays and major holidays. Friday evening hours are made possible by Fifth Third Bank.
    The Museum is located at 2445 Monroe Street at Scottwood Avenue, just west of the downtown business district and one block off I-75 with exit designations posted. For general information, visitors can call 419-255-8000 or 800-644-6862, or visit www.toledomuseum.org
  • Friday, August 13, 2010 12:00 PM | Anonymous

    On Monday, September 27, 11:30 AM, The Jewish Museum in Manhattan will be presenting a lecture by renowned ceramicist Edmund de Waal.

    He will be discussing his new book, "The Hare with Amber Eyes: A Family’s Century of Art and Loss."

    The book relates the story of the family of Charles Ephrussi through the journey of his collection of 264 netsuke, now in de Waal’s possession. The family’s properties were seized by the Nazis in 1938 and the collection, smuggled to safety by their maid, is almost all that remains of their vast holdings.

    The Museum will be mailing a postcard this month to advertise this lecture, and would like to reach out to all INS Members in the New York area.

    To order tickets, call 212-423-3337 or click:

    http://www.thejewishmuseum.org/DaytimePrograms

    Tickets: $15 general / $12 Students and 65+ / $10 Members.

    The Jewish Museum
    1109 Fifth Avenue, at 92nd St
    New York, NY 10128
    212-660-1527
    http://www.thejewishmuseum.org/

    P.S. A review of this book will be in a forthcoming INS Journal.

    P.P.S. The New York Times has an article about it in Friday’s paper:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/13/arts/design/13antiques.html?_r=1&scp=1&sq=amber%20eyes&st=cse

  • Wednesday, August 04, 2010 12:00 PM | Anonymous
    Hello International Netsuke Society members:

    As you probably know, Los Angeles has been chosen as the host-city for the next convention of the International Netsuke Society, to be held in May 2011.

    The Los Angeles County Museum of Art is home to the Raymond and Frances Bushell Collection of Netsuke. In conjunction with the upcoming INS Convention, LACMA is planning to organize an exhibition of netsuke from the Bushell Collection. With a fresh approach, rather than focusing on their traditional role as functional items or their meanings as cultural artifacts, this exhibition will focus on netsuke’s place in the modern-day domain of art collecting.

    We invite INS members to participate as we seek to compile a selection of the ‘top’ works in the Bushell Collection at LACMA. The exhibition aims to reflect what netsuke collectors today consider the most outstanding works based on the responses we receive from INS members worldwide. We hope you will share with us your ‘Top 10’ favorites from the Bushell Collection.

    To take part in this survey simply go to one of the currently available sources where the entire collection can be seen and select the ten netsuke from the collection that you find to be the most outstanding examples. The Raymond and Frances Bushell Collection at the LACMA can be seen in its entirety in two places: The 2003 collection catalog titled “The Raymond and Frances Bushell Collection of Netsuke: A Legacy at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art” and the LACMA web site located at www.lacma.org (see below for a link to the search site.)

    Please fax your list to (323) 857-4703 or send it via email to cdrosse@lacma.org. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Chris Drosse at the above email address. The deadline for responses is October 1, 2010.

    This is an entirely anonymous process. No names will appear on any lists, labels or other exhibition-related materials.

    To view all of the netsuke in the Bushell collection, click on the following link.
    http://collectionsonline.lacma.org/mwebcgi/mweb.exe?request=advform
    The page that opens should be the ADVANCED SEARCH page. In the KEYWORDS box enter Bushell and in the TYPE OF ARTWORK box enter netsuke. Then hit SEARCH at the bottom of the page. This search should bring up 854 objects. You can also do more specific searches if you are looking for a particular artist, subject, etc.

    Many thanks,
    Chris Drosse
Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software